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Did You Know? Fun Facts for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) – 4-PS3-4

 Posted by on September 23, 2020  Phenomenon Ideas  Comments Off on Did You Know? Fun Facts for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) – 4-PS3-4
Sep 232020
 

4-PS3-4 Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another

As we create informational texts for each of the Next Generation Science Standards, there are tons of amazing, interesting, and just plain weird facts we are learning. I thought it would be fun to share some of them with you, so I hope you enjoy these facts about wind turbines…. and sheep!

Wind turbines are usually very large machines: Sometimes as tall as the Statue of Liberty! The larger the turbine blades, the more wind it picks up. This means more energy can be generated.  To generate a lot of energy, huge groups of turbines are bunched together.  These groups are called wind farms.  We usually think of farms that produce food for people to eat.  Wind farms produce energy for people to use.  Wind turbines need a lot of space, but that doesn’t mean the land around them is useless.  It can also serve another purpose as is shown in the photo above.  This land is used for two purposes:  grazing sheep and producing energy!

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This fun fact and more are found in the text: Harnessing the Wind by Sarah Wassner Flynn.  Harnessing the Wind is found in, StarrMatica Texts:  Science Your Way, a collection of informational texts written specifically to address every K-5 NGSS Performance Expectation.  All texts in the collection are written at six different Lexile levels, so all students can read the same content at their reading level.  You can find out more about StarrMatica Texts:  Science Your Way here: http://www.starrmatica.com

Phenomenon for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) 5-ESS1-2

 Posted by on August 12, 2020  Phenomenon Ideas  Comments Off on Phenomenon for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) 5-ESS1-2
Aug 122020
 

5-ESS1-2 Represent data in graphical displays to reveal patterns of daily changes in length and direction of shadows, day and night, and the seasonal appearance of some stars in the night sky

If you are teaching the Next Generation Science Standards and are looking for phenomena ideas, you’ve come to the right place! I like to think about phenomena as lesson starters. They are photos or videos showing an observable event in the universe and are used to get kids thinking, asking questions, and discussing their prior knowledge. For more information about using phenomena, there is a handy printable guide and video here:
https://www.nextgenscience.org/resources/phenomena

And now, on to our shadows phenomenon!

Do you see a caravan of black camels crossing the desert in this photo? At first glance it might seem so. But take a closer look and you discover that what you are seeing are the camels’ shadows. Since the photographer took the photo from above, you can only see the small, white tops of the camels!

Why do you think the camels’ shadows are so large? Have you ever seen other really long shadows? Have you ever been playing outside in the evening and noticed that your shadow is really tall like a giant? Have you ever noticed that at other times of the day your shadow is closer to your size or hardly there at all? Why is that?

The changes in the length of our shadows have to do with the position of the sun. Assuming you are standing still outside all day long, the sun would appear to rise and set. When the sun’s light is blocked while it is low on the horizon, either in the morning or the evening, your shadow will be longer. As the sun approaches midday, shadows become shorter and shorter until the sun is overhead.

Shadows also change in direction throughout the day. When the sun is behind you, your shadow appears in front of you. When you are facing the sun, your shadow trails behind you. If the sun is to your left, then shadows form on your right. If the sun is on your right, shadows appear on your left.

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These excerpts are from the text: Keeping Track of Your Shadow by Michelle Negron Bueno.  Keeping Track of Your Shadow is found in, StarrMatica Texts: Science Your Way, a collection of informational texts written specifically to address every K-5 NGSS Performance Expectation.  All texts in the collection begin with a phenomenon photo and are written at six different Lexile levels, so all students can read the same content at their reading level.  You can find out more about StarrMatica Texts:  Science Your Way here: http://www.starrmatica.com

Phenomenon for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) 2-LS2-2

 Posted by on May 6, 2020  Phenomenon Ideas  Comments Off on Phenomenon for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) 2-LS2-2
May 062020
 

2-LS2-2  Develop a simple model that mimics the function of an animal in dispersing seeds or pollinating plants.

If you are teaching the Next Generation Science Standards and are looking for phenomena ideas, you’ve come to the right place! I like to think about phenomena as lesson starters. They are photos or videos showing an observable event in the universe and are used to get kids thinking, asking questions, and discussing their prior knowledge. For more information about using phenomena, there is a handy printable guide and video here:
https://www.nextgenscience.org/resources/phenomena

And now, on to our pollinator phenomenon!

When we think about pollinators, most of us probably think of bees.  But did you know many other creatures pollinate plants including bats, butterflies, and hummingbirds, and lemurs?  Lemurs are the world’s largest pollinators!  In fact, they are the main pollinators of a type of tree in Madagascar, an island off the coast of Africa. They pull open the tree’s flowers and stick their long snouts inside. As they gobble up the flowers, lemurs collect pollen all over their faces and bodies. They then leap to another flower, transporting the pollen along the way.

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This information is from the text: Powerful Pollinators! by Sarah Wassner Flynn.  Powerful Pollinators! is found in, StarrMatica Texts: Science Your Way, a collection of informational texts written specifically to address every K-5 NGSS Performance Expectation.  All texts in the collection begin with a phenomenon photo and are written at six different Lexile levels, so all students can read the same content at their reading level.  You can find out more about StarrMatica Texts:  Science Your Way here: http://www.starrmatica.com/index.php?/main/texts

Phenomenon for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) 3-PS2-2

 Posted by on April 7, 2020  Phenomenon Ideas  Comments Off on Phenomenon for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) 3-PS2-2
Apr 072020
 

3-PS2-2  Make observations and/or measurements of an object’s motion to provide evidence that a pattern can be used to predict future motion.

If you are teaching the Next Generation Science Standards and are looking for phenomena ideas, you’ve come to the right place! I like to think about phenomena as lesson starters. They are photos or videos showing an observable event in the universe and are used to get kids thinking, asking questions, and discussing their prior knowledge. For more information about using phenomena, there is a handy printable guide and video here:
https://www.nextgenscience.org/resources/phenomena

When you look at the stone in this photo, how do you think it got there? Has the stone been pushed by the wind or pulled by gravity? Has an animal or a person moved it forward without leaving any footprints? If you can’t seem to come up with an answer, you’re not alone! The mystery of this stone and many others like it has baffled scientists for almost 100 years!

This photo gives us a glimpse of a natural phenomenon called “sailing stones.” Sailing stones can be seen in a few locations in the U.S. The most famous can be found in Death Valley National Park. There, hundreds of stones, rock, and boulders dot the landscape. Their mysterious trails give evidence of their movement. No one has ever watched them move, and yet it is clear that somehow they do. They sit for years. Then suddenly a park ranger would find that they had drifted to new locations. Sometimes they move only a few inches and in other cases thousands of feet!

Scientists set up an experiment to figure out how these stones move, and here is what they found:  Every winter, several inches of rain freeze creating a pond of ice in an area of Death Valley known as the Racetrack Playa. Stones, rocks, and boulders dot the pond’s surface. As the sun warms the ice, it begins to crack. The thin sheet of ice covering the lake bed is only about the thickness of three quarters stacked on each other. As it breaks up under the sun, pieces of ice accumulate behind the rocks. Working together, the wind and ice gently push the rocks forward along the soft, moist ground.  Eventually, the water evaporates. The ground dries out. The trails are visible for all to see.

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This information is from the text: Solving the Mystery of Sailing Stones by Michelle Negron Bueno.  Solving the Mystery of Sailing Stones is found in, StarrMatica Texts: Science Your Way, a collection of informational texts written specifically to address every K-5 NGSS Performance Expectation.  All texts in the collection begin with a phenomenon photo and are written at six different Lexile levels, so all students can read the same content at their reading level.  You can find out more about StarrMatica Texts:  Science Your Way here: http://www.starrmatica.com/index.php?/main/texts

Phenomenon for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) 1-LS3-1

 Posted by on March 10, 2020  Phenomenon Ideas  Comments Off on Phenomenon for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) 1-LS3-1
Mar 102020
 

1-LS3-1 Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.

If you are teaching the Next Generation Science Standards and are looking for phenomena ideas, you’ve come to the right place! I like to think about phenomena as lesson starters. They are photos or videos showing an observable event in the universe and are used to get kids thinking, asking questions, and discussing their prior knowledge. For more information about using phenomena, there is a handy printable guide and video here:
https://www.nextgenscience.org/resources/phenomena

And now, on to our pelican phenomenon!

The pouch on a pelican’s beak helps it scoop up fish. 

This is just like we would use a net.

Our tools help us to do the things birds’ beaks are able to do!

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This excerpt is from the text: All Types of Bird Beaks by Sarah Wassner Flynn.  All Types of Bird Beaks is found in, StarrMatica Texts: Science Your Way, a collection of informational texts written specifically to address every K-5 NGSS Performance Expectation.  All texts in the collection begin with a phenomenon photo and are written at six different Lexile levels, so all students can read the same content at their reading level.  You can find out more about StarrMatica Texts:  Science Your Way here: http://www.starrmatica.com/index.php?/main/texts

Phenomenon for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) – 4-PS3-1

 Posted by on February 12, 2020  Phenomenon Ideas  Comments Off on Phenomenon for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) – 4-PS3-1
Feb 122020
 

4-PS3-1 Use evidence to construct an explanation relating the speed of an object to the energy of that object.

If you are teaching the Next Generation Science Standards and are looking for phenomena ideas, you’ve come to the right place! I like to think about phenomena as lesson starters. They are photos or videos showing an observable event in the universe and are used to get kids thinking, asking questions, and discussing their prior knowledge. For more information about using phenomena, there is a handy printable guide and video here:
https://www.nextgenscience.org/resources/phenomena

And now, on to our penguin phenomenon!

Did you know that even though penguins are classified as birds, they can’t fly? But as you can see in this photo, that doesn’t mean that penguins can’t become airborne. Penguins have the ability to hurtle themselves from the water in a spectacular way.

A penguin’s launch through the air actually begins on the ice. Penguins spread oil on their feathers with their beaks to make them slick in the water and to trap air between their feathers and skin. This air becomes extremely important later in the water.

The penguin starts the process of launching back onto the ice by actually diving down, as deep as 1,800 feet. That’s the same distance as six football fields! The dive gives the penguin a “running start” to its launch. When it gets deep enough, it turns back toward the surface. As it begins to swim upward, the penguin releases tiny bubbles of air that it had trapped between its feathers and skin. The bubbles cover the penguin’s body like a jacket. The bubbles store energy. As the penguin releases them, more and more energy transfers to the penguin, helping it rise through the water faster and faster.

Energy from the water collides with the energy made by the penguin using its flippers, tail, and tiny bubbles. The penguin’s speed, just as it breaks the surface of the water, is now twice as fast as it was when it was swimming downward! The faster the penguin’s speed, the higher it will rise as it flies out of the water toward the ice.

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This excerpt is from the text: The Flight of a Penguin by Michelle Negron Bueno.  The Flight of a Penguin is found in, StarrMatica Texts:  Science Your Way, a collection of informational texts written specifically to address every K-5 NGSS Performance Expectation.  All texts in the collection begin with a phenomenon photo and are written at six different Lexile levels, so all students can read the same content at their reading level.  You can find out more about StarrMatica Texts:  Science Your Way here: http://www.starrmatica.com/index.php?/main/texts

Did You Know? Fun Facts for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) – 3-PS2-3

 Posted by on January 8, 2020  Phenomenon Ideas  Comments Off on Did You Know? Fun Facts for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) – 3-PS2-3
Jan 082020
 

3-PS2-3 Ask questions to determine cause and effect relationships of electric or magnetic interactions between two objects not in contact with each other.

As we create informational texts for each of the Next Generation Science Standards, there are tons of amazing, interesting, and just plain weird facts we are learning. I thought it would be fun to share some of them with you, so this is the first in a series of posts that tell interesting science facts!

Magnets are also used to protect the health of animals and keep our food safe. Cows that are bred for their meat graze in fields. The fields can have small bits of metal stuck inside the grasses. The debris from the field can be harmful to the cow. It can also hurt people if it gets into the meat. Magnets are passed over a cow’s feed to remove stray metal objects. Farmers also put long, narrow magnets into the feed. The cow eats the magnets, which doesn’t hurt the cow, but it is never something a person should do! Magnets can get stuck in humans and cause a lot of problems. For the cow, as the magnets pass through its digestive tract, magnetic objects are collected. The debris comes out with the cow’s manure instead of getting lodged inside your hamburger! 

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This fun fact and more are found in the text: Amazing Magnets by Michelle Negron Bueno.  Amazing Magnets is found in, StarrMatica Texts:  Science Your Way, a collection of informational texts written specifically to address every K-5 NGSS Performance Expectation.  All texts in the collection are written at six different Lexile levels, so all students can read the same content at their reading level.  You can find out more about StarrMatica Texts:  Science Your Way here: http://www.starrmatica.com/index.php?/main/texts